Content for Materials Testing Professionals

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Steel Reinforcement Bar: A Tensile Testing Guide

Jeff Shaffer, Manager of Product Marketing and Management for the Instron® Industrial Products Group, talks with Advanced Materials & Processes (AM&P) about how critical understanding the basics of tensile testing is to ensure product quality of steel reinforcing bar, or rebar.

Posted On Jul 28, 2015 04:30 PM

Updates to Metals Testing Standards

Discover how and why recent updates to testing standards for metals, including ISO 6892-1 and ASTM E8/8M, have occurred for measuring strain.

Posted On Jul 01, 2015 05:00 PM

Efficiency of Continuously Increasing Load During Tests

This month, Instron hydraulic wedge grips had the privilege to be on the cover of Materials Testing, a German-English materials testing journal. The journal published an article by an Instron customer about testing the fatigue behavior of construction materials.

Posted On Jul 29, 2014 02:10 PM

Additive Manufacturing Contest at the SAMPE Seattle Conference

A 57.15 mm tall and .0193 kg vertical support column withstood 4413.9 pound force at the SAMPE Seattle 2014 Conference, where Instron provided a 5969 Dual Column Testing System for the Student Additive Manufacturing Contest.

Posted On Jul 28, 2014 02:10 PM

Interplas 2014 Preview: What’s the Cost to Your Reputation?

As one of the most trusted manufacturers of testing equipment for the plastics market, Instron has designed a tradeshow experience that takes you on a journey through the challenges (and occasional horrors) of plastics materials testing.

Posted On Jul 23, 2014 02:10 PM

Looking for Ways to Keep Bent Test Specimens Securely Aligned?

Gripping bent specimens is challenging, but there are a few things you do. One, flatten the tabs with a small press prior to inserting into normal grip jaws meant for flat specimens. Two, use a combination of convex and concave grip jaws to eliminate the need to flatten the specimens. Three, use a set of dual side-acting grips that will basically flatten the ends when the grips are closed.

Posted On Jul 18, 2014 02:10 PM